Pranayama for Heart and related Research

 


"Breathing is the link between the mind and the body. By 

controlling the breath, we can calm the mind and heal the 

body." - Deepak Chopra



Pranayama is a type of yoga that entails controlled breathing practises. Several pranayama techniques are thought to have potential heart health benefits. Here are three pranayama techniques and some research on the subject - 


Human Heart


1. Nadi Shodhana Pranayama (Alternate Nostril Breathing): This pranayama technique involves alternating between breathing through one nostril and expelling through the other. It is thought to aid in the reduction of stress and anxiety, the improvement of lung function, and the promotion of general cardiovascular health. According to a 2013 study, practising Nadi Shodhana Pranayama for 30 minutes daily for eight weeks dramatically decreased heart rate variability in hypertensive individuals.


2. Bhramari Pranayama (Humming Bee Breath): Inhale deeply and exhale while generating a humming sound with this pranayama technique. It is thought to help with stress and anxiety reduction, circulation improvement, and relaxation. According to a 2014 study, doing Bhramari Pranayama for 12 weeks decreased blood pressure and heart rate in hypertensive patients.


3. Ujjayi Pranayama (Victorious Breath): Inhale deeply and exhale through the nose while tightening the back of the throat, producing a gentle hissing sound. It is thought to aid in the reduction of stress and anxiety, the improvement of lung function, and the promotion of general cardiovascular health. A 2016 study discovered that doing Ujjayi Pranayama for six months decreased various cardiovascular risk factors in prehypertensive patients, including blood pressure and lipid profile.


        It is crucial to highlight, however, that pranayama and breathing practice should not be utilised in place of appropriate medical therapy for cardiac problems. If you have any pre-existing medical illnesses or are at high risk for heart disease, talk to your doctor before beginning any new exercise or breathing programme.

        

To minimise the risk of heart disease and heart attack, it is also vital to keep a balanced diet, engage in regular physical activity, manage stress levels, and avoid smoking and excessive alcohol use.


Tanmay Bhati

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